Fast Implementation = Profits

By Mark / March 7, 2013
Fast Implementation

Fast ImplementationThere was a time not very long ago where I would start a project and then sit on it for a month or 6 weeks and tweak it and get it right before I launched it.

I am happy to tell you those days are gone.

My focus is now coming up with ideas, doing a small bit of research and then launching the product or site as fast as possible, then and only then do I start to tweak it and refine it.

Fast Implementation and Minimum Viable products that test the market are the most efficient form of business available to you.

Every major company in the world does it to some extent.  Ever buy a computer game and then get updates and patches to fix bugs and glitches?

Many of those are known about before the launch but it makes it easier for the company to focus resources on the feedback the customers give them rather than what they think they might need.

This week I conceived, built and launched a site with a total of about  4-6 hours work.

The Idea was simple, give same day rebates on internet marketing products. The research was even simpler I asked the owner of a rebate site if the site was still profitable or had people grown tired of rebates and preferred bonus’s more.

To help drive traffic I decided to swap a like or tweet for the rebate.

A really simple idea, I am the first to admit it’s not original or unique but that doesn’t matter I can build on the basic idea over time.

I know it can be profitable if I focus on good quality products, get traffic and give great customer service.

I launched it without a logo, without fancy graphics, in fact the timeline cover on the Facebook page is truly horrendous.

None of that matters at the moment it would be like putting frills and glitter on a elephant.

The site is out there and I can now spend time getting traffic and seeing if it looks like being successful , if it is then I can spend money making it more visually appealing and having cool stuff coded.

I launched with 2 products one of which is an exclusive 50% off deal on a new product the other is a healthy rebate on the best plugin of it’s kind on the market. (you’ll have to go to the site to find out what they are 🙂 )

The most important features are in place, a way for people to share the site and a way for them to subscribe and get additional discounts, and more importantly instructions telling them how to get rebates on the same day they purchase.

What more does a rebate site need?

If it flops then I’ve wasted a few hours on it and not a lot of money.

The alternative was to spend a few months on the idea and building a really cool looking site with lots of functions and features.

I could have a form on the site that people fill in and that automatically processes the rebates . It would cost time and money to implement and test.

Once there is a need for it then I can add it but for now they can send me an email, it works and it cost minutes to set up and no cost.

Try to adopt some level of fast implementation to your online business today and see how much easier IM becomes.

  •  Conceive the Idea
  • Do Basic Research
  • Create a Minimum Viable Product
  • Launch
  • Tweek and Improve

Thats it, if you aren’t doing Fast Implementation then you should be!

Check out My Fast implementation Project at Viral Rebates

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Mark

https://plus.google.com/me/posts

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7 comments
Patrick Donovan

I would like to stress the word “minimum” when you state “Create a Minimum Viable Product”.

This requires strict adherence to an absolute minimum set of functional requirements that are based upon the results of step 2: Do Basic Research.

Without such a reference, fast implementation will tend to revert back to a search for perfection and scope creep. Before you know it, you’re back to wearing a tortoise shell.

While you’re branding your site as a “rebate” site, you might consider adding bonuses on TOP of rebates as an irresistible offer (when appropriate for a given product).

That could be implemented in a very automated manner, perhaps integrating such automation at the time you further automate the notification process with rebates. Or maybe not. 😉 Maybe just doing it… fast.

Thank you, Mark. Best of luck with the site.

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Mark
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Good point about the bonus’s that should be easy to implement, as i could initially just add a link to the rebate notification…. hmmmmm

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Ed

Hi Mark,

You have hit the nail on the head once more., I offer “bare bones” video ads to some of my offline clients which works for some and not for others. What I find is that it is a little bit of the “egg and the chicken”.

Some clients want Rolls Royce videos for Mini money yet by getting something out there on a skeleton budget is better than nothing at all. We can always work things up from there once the ball is rolling.

In the end it all comes down to taking action and the sooner the better.

Cheers Mark,
Ed
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Ben Brooks

A great example of this is Jack Born’s AW ProTools. He started out with basic features and since then added several invaluable tools and features that customers have requested.

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Mark
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Yep, I love awprotools , another example is hybrid connect

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Tim Goodwin

My take on the fast implementation approach is the ‘early adopters’ of your latest idea are likely to be existing clients or passionate followers of you and your stuff. If there is little or no interest from this group it is generally going to be very hard to market it to colder traffic.

Another thought… which Ben Brookes above mentioned is focussing on the core features of the product first… how many times have you seen products that are weak on the core focus and then stacked to the hilt with a gazillion bonuses!

I have software being developed right now, where the focus is JUST on the core features… I could add many more, but there is literally no point wasting time and money until I see if anyone gives a damn about the core stuff in the first place…
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truxter

I have learned the same.

The harder I work on a project and more time I put into it, the more I seem to over complicate the project. If i make a rough simple program with bare functioning minimum, people see it for it’s basic. It’s quick to download and doesn’t use much resources. as I watch the downloads increase or stagnate, I decide whether I want to work on the project.

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