Internet Marketing Products – Who Will Buy My Magic Beans

By Mark / February 23, 2011

I hope that I am preaching to the choir with this post! If not I hope that I have at least a few new choir members at the end of it.

I did have a post planned about how taking baby steps are the way forward with your business but that can wait. This is more important, if it resonates with just 1 person then it ‘s a worthwhile post.

Do you believe in fairies?

Do you believe in Unicorns?

Do you think that Jack In the Beanstalk is a true story?

No I guess that 99% of you will answer no to that…magic beans yeah right Mark, pull the other one ( The missing 1%…it’s the Internet, people believe all sorts of stuff they read!)

So we’ve established that you are quite sane and rational, now if I offered you a magic button system that you just just needed to press a button let the sofware run and it would generate thousands of dollars a day would you believe me?

The chances are that a few of you might.

If I dressed that up with a fancy sales page, proof of earnings and testimonials I can guarantee that even a few more would.

Now imagine if i got a bunch of my buddies to email all their contacts and tell them about my magic button system and say look as a gift for buying this magic button you can have a nice gift of this cool course. I bet you that I’d get quite a few people buy my magic button.

In all your time online and in Internet marketing have you ever seen a product with a sales letter full of big red headlines and Hype ever deliver on what it promised? I know that I for one certainly haven’t.

Nada, zilch zip.. Not one has delivered.

Salesletters are created by very skillful people and are designed to get your emotions firing, if you don’t want to get sucked in by every piece of crap out there then you need to keep your emotions under control. Read the sales letter, or watch the video then go away from it and come back later. Now look at it with detachment.

Could the sales letter apply to any other poor program you’ve bought?

Do The claims sound realistic?

If there were no proof of earning or testimonials would you still feel as strongly about it?

Finally ask yourself 2 questions…

If I had this system and it was making me $175,000 a month or whatever the claim is would I sell it for $67 on clickbank?

And… If it’s so good why Is marketer X offering me a bonus supposedly worth more than the product to buy it.

Still want to buy my Magic Beans?

Let me know what you think of this post by commenting below, the best comment might even get some magic beans.

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Mark

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20 comments
Tess

In the chill drizzle of a London winter, a wily guru’s words can be beguiling. They hold out the promise of a future free of money worries, holidays and happy, well-fed families..

Whilst I agree with your blog, i also envy the gurus’ ability to craft these clever letters and grind my teeth with frustration at my pathetic efforts to write even a few compelling bullet points. (I am a perfectionist too which doesn’t help.) So my distaste for their magic beans is mingled with admiration for their copywriting skills.

As an aside, I am baffled by the continued use of the sales letter template with its long copy, screaming red headlines etc. I hate them but maybe it’s because I am inured. Are there other successful formats more suited, say, to professional products (eg for HR managers, a market I am trying to reach), rather than some poor soul with acne and no girlfriend. I’d value a serious blog discussion on that theme..

I know your beans – sorry pearls – of wisdom won’t deliver a magic beanstalk overnight but at least you deliver on your products, Mark.

Keep up the good rants and send some of your Spanish sun our way!

Tess

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Mark
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Tess, good point you make there about trying to make 1 size fit all when it comes to sales letters. At times I feel I end up in no mans land when it comes to sales letters, i don’t want hype, I just want to layout my wares and let people choose but it doesn’t always work so I find myself adding elements of hypey sales letters.

I suppose it’s a lot like your local market , the green grocers who shouts and makes a fuss and a lot of noise , sell more than the organic farmer that has better stock but is too reserved.

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Mark Pocock

Tess as a copywriter I’ll perhaps shed some light on your comments.

You say:
They hold out the promise of a future free of money worries, holidays and happy, well-fed families

People buy on emotion. Then justify with logic as soon as they decide to buy. So the sales letter to be effective has to appeal to greed, hope, curiousity, anger, and a heap of other emotions. As humans we’re a heaving mass of emotions.

We all want to make more money. Have more holidays. Be smarter than other people. Drive nice cars.

I think tests prove that screaming red headlines have always pulled the highest response in the past. Dunno if that’s still true.

I tend to go for the oposite angle nowadays. Don’t make your advertising look like advertising. Make your ad look like interesting news. A blog post or an article. So then you’re more likely to get your ad read.

Also I never read any sales letter past the headline if the headline is hypey. I just think the letter is going to be full of BS.

That’s why you need a good headline. -:)

This was a quick reply so forgive any typhos. -:)

cheers

Mark

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Ian McLaren

Hi Mark

“go away from it and come back later. Now look at it with detachment”

Is a truly powerful strategy that I found works well for me, its quite alarming sometimes how different things look in the “cold light of day”

Ian McLaren

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EdK

One of the most useful pointers I’ve found, is to go by the testimonials. Unfortunately some products that are very good don’t come with decent testimonials, in other words, writeups from people who succeeded with the product. Nevertheless if I honed my skills of testimonial-reading and stuck mostly to this method, I’d be right much of the time. As it is I’m wrong most of the time frankly but I do bag some goodies in truth.

But frankly I’m reasonably pleased at the increasing accuracy, despite anything I’ve said, of my BS-sussing skills. This has kept me out of quite a bit of trouble

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Shaun Baird

My beans…

Tell a story… people buy a story…don’t even hint at a solution until they are engrossed in their story.. if done well, hype is not always needed, some gentle nudging is enough if the story is good.

When you open a letter in the mail with a “you are a winner” printed on the front, what do you do? quick open of the envelope and bin it…

When you open a hand written letter with a hand written address, you need to read it.. it’s personal.

Ok, on topic, we are all acclimatized to hype ad are acutely aware of it, so we are quick to respond with a pre-formatted reply we’ve got in our head such as “spam”.
Many people dont have that luxury as they are not as acclimatized as we are, and they fall for it.

If something is good, I’d always recommend to ensure there is an iron clad refund policy backed by someone like clickbank, and look for “real” support, and look for other peoples genuine progress reports.

Other than that, stick with one thing and nothing else.
Shaun

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Kean

Hi Mark,

This is an interesting post. You make some good points, but what I am about to say in the rest of my comment may not be very pleasant to you.

Personally, I feel that a little bit of hype is absolutely required in sales. The important point is that the hype must not be a lie. Hype can always be something true, but wrote in a way that, as you said, appeals to emotion.

On top of that, fancy sales page, proof of earnings and testimonials, are all part of the sales process too. If you created a product, would you not provide proof of earnings if you absolutely have it? Would you not provide testimonials if you have them?

You said to ask ourselves, “If I had this system and it was making me $175,000 a month or whatever the claim is would I sell it for $67 on clickbank?”

Well then I should really ask myself that question based on your beyond commission product because the headline is a such “$96.99 Invested – 7,798 New Subscribers – $8,654 In Revenue – 7 Days Total”. Your course has proof of earnings, testimonials and is sold for $67.

So then is your course a “magic bean” then? Look, I’m not saying that your course suggests pushing a button and waiting for money to roll in.

What I’m trying to say is that these “magic bean” elements are sometimes required in the sales process. Your sales page included them too. Too much is bad, but without a little bit of them, used appropriately, your sales will take a dip.

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Mark
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Hi,

I take you point wholeheartedly, I was in particular referring to 3 or 4 launches that happened recently with faked screenshots and very over hyped sales letters.

Testimonials are useful if they can be easily verified, most of the testimonials used on my products are taken directly from the forums inside them or in the case of BC the live seminar.

I did think long and hard about about the headline and discussed it with quite a few people more experienced than me. In the end i went with it because it relates directly to a case study in the course. to me this was preferable to using something like “Learn the exactly system that made me $140,000 in 6 months ” which is difficult to prove.

It is a fine line to thread between hype and laying out the facts in a way that will attract customers I try to do it in the most ethical way possible. Unfortunately many don’t have ethics high on their list of attributes

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Kean

Hi Mark,

I agree with you and I just want to be clear that I’m not saying your testimonials are fake. To tell you the truth, I am seriously considering buying your beyond commission course, because I am particularly intriguied by how you got 4000 subscirbers in 1 day. The amount of “hype” in your sales letter is no where near that of other sales letters.

I just want you to know that what I said in my previous comment was in no way meant as a personal attack at your product. What I said was just for the purpose of proving my point.

Btw, I am also intriguied by your wso on affiliate marketing. From your posts and the stuff you put out, I can tell that your not one of those typical marketers. Just so you know 🙂

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Mark
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Kean,

I didn’t take it personally in the slightest , you made very valid comments.

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Larry

Mark
How do we get our picture on your side bar ,
Larry

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Mark
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Larry, I think that facebook just displays fans and people who have clicked on “Like”

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Rudi

Hi Mark

Im very new to internet marketing and still trying to get a grasp of the basic concepts, but I gotta say what turned me down from trying out WPGoldmine was the printed image of (very enthusiastic) forum topics, later to find out I had to subscribe to even watch the actual topic list on the forum.

So, while still interested, I would have to spend an enourmous amount of time researching reviews and comments just to find out if its subscribing to WPG is really worth for someone like me with absolutly zero experience and knowledge on the subject.
And I would have to put all those reviews and comments under a time-consuming microscope too.

All that only because I really felt the forum topics were a little too hyped for my taste.

Im not trying to be critical, just pointing out that the same stuff you hate about hyped ads are the same tools you have to use for advertising your own products. Its very hard for someone like me to tell truth from fiction.

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Mark
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Rudi,

The comments are from genuine members who are using the forum and guides to make money. Thats a lot different from me just making stuff ,up or adding false testimonials. If you’d taken 2 minutes to join you’d have been able to ask the people themselves and then make your own decisions. If you find they aren’t genuine then tell the world! I have nothing to hide and neither do the members.

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Rudi

Mark,

Im sorry if i failed to properly get my point across. I was trying to underline how new comers might not be able to tell the difference from a genuine sales letter and a misleading one – especially if the writer is clever enough not to blow it out of proportion.

I believe the comments are indeed genuine, since I spent the last hours reading more of your posts and understanding how serious you are about your work ethic, wich is comendable. And I will be joining for a trial as soon as I confirm my paypal account. Again, Im sorry for any insult I may have caused.
Cheers.

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Mark
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Rudi,

No offence taken, when you join send me a PM and i’ll give you some pointers for getting started.

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Ann

Hi, I’m Jacks mother and I keep buying magic beans but they never sprout. However, I can feel a bit of faith returning while perusing this site, so,… I am going to hang around in here for a while, hoping the Giant doesn’t get my blood.

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Jay

Some pretty funny comments here as we all pat ourselves on the back for not being a dumb as those other “idiots”. But I will admin to being intrigued by these offers when I first started and it was only an abundance of caution that prevented me from enriching several marketers. Even so, I did purchase some products that proved to be, if not quite useless, pretty close to it.

We are all at the mercy of our wants and desires and any skilled copywriter can pull our strings very successfully. You have only your own common sense to protect you.

As Mark so aptly says, if I were to have a system or product that made me a gazillion dollars a month, why would I want to sell it for pennies and increase my own competition?

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Dixie Blakely

Mark, I am laughing as I read this, because I have fallen for a lot of that junk in the past, but still getting those in the mail, and thinking about all of those rip-offs I fell into.I will check all that email as I go along and send you a list, I think they all know me! 🙂

Great article and the truth, you do not have to convince me, I am a believer.

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Mari

I have been looking everywhere to get me some magic beans, so glad to know you have them 🙂

Anyway, it is not that people actually believe in this stuff, I think it is more that they WANT to believe that it will work for them. Plus, sometimes the sales letters are so convincing, that they really reel you in. I don’t get reeled in, mind you, because I do take that approach you mentioned of stepping away and going back to it. I also always look for reviews first, especially in the Warrior Forums, so it makes it much easier to hit the back/exit button with absolutely no remorse or “what if it works” train of thought.

For me, I think the best comparison to these magic beans/push button money machines is the lottery, and everyone believes in that right?

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